Amoris Laetitia and Kasper’s Proposal

#AMORIS LAETITIA is here and …

And Kasper’s Proposal [here and here] is in it:

Footnote 351 [paragraph 305] In certain cases, this can include the help of the sacraments. Hence, “I want to remind priests that the confessional must not be a torture chamber, but rather an encounter with the Lord’s mercy” (Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii Gaudium [24 November 2013], 44: AAS 105 [2013], 1038). I would also point out that the Eucharist “is not a prize for the perfect, but a powerful medicine and nourishment for the weak” (ibid., 47: 1039). (My emphasis)

No wonder Cardinal Kasper could hardly contain his delight in March.


And what does the Vatican say the Pope says in Amoris Laetitia regarding access to the sacraments for people who live in ‘irregular’ situations?

“Naturally this poses the question: what does the Pope say in relation to access to the sacraments for people who live in ‘irregular’ situations?”, continued the cardinal. “Pope Francis reiterates the need to discern carefully the situation in keeping with St. John Paul II’s Familiaris consortio. ‘Discernment must help to find possible ways of responding to God and growing in the midst of limits. By thinking that everything is black and white, we sometimes close off the way of grace and of growth, and discourage paths of sanctification which give glory to God’. … In the sense of this ‘via caritatis’, the Pope affirms, in a humble and simple manner, in a note that the help of the sacraments may also be given in ‘certain cases’. But for this purpose he does not offer us case studies or recipes, but instead simply reminds us of two of his famous phrases: ‘I want to remind priests that the confessional should not be a torture chamber but rather an encounter with the Lord’s mercy’ and the Eucharist ‘is not a prize for the perfect but a powerful medicine and nourishment for the weak'”.Presentation of the post-Synodal apostolic exhortation Amoris Laetitia: the logic of pastoral mercy, 08.04.2016 (My emphasis)


Kasper’s Proposal:

A divorced and remarried person:
1. If he repents of his failure in the first marriage,
2. If he has clarified the obligations of the first marriage, if it is definitively ruled out that he could turn back,
3. If he cannot abandon without further harm the responsibilities taken on with the new civil marriage,
4. If however he is doing the best he can to live out the possibilities of the second marriage on the basis of the faith and to raise his children in the faith,
5. If he has a desire for the sacraments as a source of strength in his situation, should we or can we deny him, after a period of time in a new direction, of “metanoia,” the sacrament of penance and then of communion?

This possible way would not be a general solution. It is not the wide road of the masses, but rather the narrow path of what is probably the smaller segment of the divorced and remarried, those sincerely interested in the sacraments. Should not the worst be avoided precisely here? In fact, when the children of the divorced and remarried do not see their parents approach the sacraments they too usually fail to find their way to confession and communion. Should we not take into account the fact that we will also lose the next generation and perhaps the one after it too? Our long-established practice, is it not showing itself to be counterproductive? [. . .] – Source: Kasper Changes the Paradigm, Bergoglio Applauds