Very Apt Prayers and Readings in the Liturgy of the Solemnity of PETER AND PAUL June 29 Mass During the Day

PETER AND PAUL Solemnity June 29 Mass During the Day

COLLECT
O God, who on the Solemnity of the Apostles Peter and Paul
give us the noble and holy joy of this day,
grant, we pray, that your Church
may in all things follow the teaching
of those through whom she received
the beginnings of right religion.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.

FIRST READING Acts 12:1-11
In those days, King Herod laid hands upon some members of the Church to harm them.
He had James, the brother of John, killed by the sword,
and when he saw that this was pleasing to the Jews
he proceeded to arrest Peter also.
–It was the feast of Unleavened Bread.–
He had him taken into custody and put in prison
under the guard of four squads of four soldiers each.
He intended to bring him before the people after Passover.
Peter thus was being kept in prison,
but prayer by the Church was fervently being made
to God on his behalf.
[…]
Then Peter recovered his senses and said,
“Now I know for certain
that the Lord sent his angel
and rescued me from the hand of Herod
and from all that the Jewish people had been expecting.”

RESPONSORIAL PSALM Ps. 34:2-3, 4-5, 6-7, 8-9

R. The angel of the Lord will rescue those who fear him.

SECOND READING 2 Tm 4:6-8, 17-18
I, Paul, am already being poured out like a libation,
and the time of my departure is at hand.
I have competed well; I have finished the race;
I have kept the faith.

From now on the crown of righteousness awaits me,
which the Lord, the just judge,
will award to me on that day, and not only to me,
but to all who have longed for his appearance.

The Lord stood by me and gave me strength,
so that through me the proclamation might be completed
and all the Gentiles might hear it.
And I was rescued from the lion’s mouth.
The Lord will rescue me from every evil threat
and will bring me safe to his heavenly Kingdom.
To him be glory forever and ever. Amen.

ALLELUIA Matt. 16:18
Tu es Petrus, et super hanc petram aedificabo Ecclesiam meam, et portae inferi non prevalebunt adversus eam.
You are Peter and upon this rock I will build my church,
and the gates of the netherworld shall not prevail again it.

GOSPEL Mt 16:13-19
[…]
He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?”
Simon Peter said in reply,
“You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.”
Jesus said to him in reply, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah.
For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my heavenly Father.
And so I say to you, you are Peter,
and upon this rock I will build my Church,
and the gates of the netherworld shall not prevail against it.
I will give you the keys to the Kingdom of heaven.
Whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven;
and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.”

PREFACE The twofold mission of Peter and Paul in the Church
[…]

For by your providence
the blessed Apostles Peter and Paul bring us joy:
Peter, foremost in confessing the faith,
Paul, its outstanding preacher,
Peter, who established the early Church from the remnant of Israel,
Paul, master and teacher of the Gentiles that you call.

PRAYER AFTER COMMUNION
Grant us, O Lord,
who have been renewed by this Sacrament,
so to live in the Church,
that, persevering in the breaking of the Bread
and in the teaching of the Apostles,
we may be one heart and one soul,
made steadfast in your love.
Through Christ our Lord.

SOLEMN BLESSING
May almighty God bless you,
for he has made you steadfast in Saint Peter’s saving confession
and through it has set you on the solid rock of the Church’s faith.
R. Amen.

And having instructed you
by the tireless preaching of Saint Paul,
may God teach you constantly by his example
to win brothers and sisters for Christ.
R. Amen.

[…]

In the Advent of #AmorisLaetitia, Providential and Apt Third Sunday of Easter Readings (OF)

Awe inspring, amazing, providential and apt Third Sunday of Easter Readings (OF) that contain counsels, encouragement, consolations, and warnings.

Thanks be to God!

I recall leading up to and during the Synod on the Family in 2015, some sharp minds noticed this as well.

Even though the LORD appears asleep, he is telling us not be afraid, he is in charge.

In the Advent of Amoris Laetitia, the providential and apt Third Sunday of Easter Readings (OF):

FIRST READING Acts 5:27-32, 40b-41

To those saying we must assent to Pope Francis’ Exhortation and his novel [as characterized by Card. Schönborn & Fr. Lombardi] teaching, the first Pope, St. Peter gives us the response we are to give, ‘we must obey God rather than men.’ And if we are made to suffer doing so, ‘we are to rejoice for having been found worthy to suffer dishonor for the sake of the name.’

RESPONSORIAL PSALM 30:2, 4, 5-6, 11-12, 13

The whole Psalm is just beautiful and self-explanatory:

Exaltabo te, Domine, quoniam extravisti me.

R. (2a) I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me. or: R. Alleluia.
I will extol you, O LORD, for you drew me clear
and did not let my enemies rejoice over me.
O LORD, you brought me up from the netherworld;
you preserved me from among those going down into the pit.
R. I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me. or: R. Alleluia.
Sing praise to the LORD, you his faithful ones,
and give thanks to his holy name.
For his anger lasts but a moment;
a lifetime, his good will.
At nightfall, weeping enters in,
but with the dawn, rejoicing.
R. I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me. or: R. Alleluia.
Hear, O LORD, and have pity on me;
O LORD, be my helper.
You changed my mourning into dancing;
O LORD, my God, forever will I give you thanks.
R. I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me. or: R. Alleluia.

SECOND READING Revelation 5:11-14

Even our enemies [every creature … on earth and under the earth and in the sea] will also cry out: “To the one who sits on the throne and to the Lamb be blessing and honor, glory and might, forever and ever.”

The nations have sunk into a pit of their own making,
they are caught by the feet in the snare they set them selves
The LORD has made himself known, has given judgement, he has trapped the wicked in the work of their own hands. – Ps 9:15-16

GOSPEL (Long Form) John 21:1-19

1) An examination of conscience [the irony] for Pope Francis:

Jesus:

“Pope Francis, do you love me more than these?” If yes, then “Feed my lambs.”

“Pope Francis, do you love me?” If yes, then “Tend my sheep.”

“Pope Francis, do you love me?” If yes, then “Feed my sheep.”

2) And the net is full with 153 large fish and it does not break: despite the defectors, the number of the elect is full [we have to pray to be counted among them] and united in single doctrine. [Cf. St. Augustine, Commentary on St. John and St. John Chrysostom, Homilies on St. Matthew, 48]

SAINT CHARLES LWANGA, MARTYR, AND HIS COMPANIONS MARTYRS

St. Charles Lwanga

SAINT CHARLES LWANGA, MARTYR, AND HIS COMPANIONS MARTYRS

Charles was one of 22 Ugandan martyrs who converted from paganism. Though he was baptized the night before being put to death, he became a moral leader. He was the chief of the royal pages and was considered the strongest athlete of the court. He was also known as “the most handsome man of the Kingdom of the Uganda.” He instructed his friends in the Catholic Faith and he personally baptized boy pages. He inspired and encouraged his companions to remain chaste and faithful. He protected his companions, ages 13-30, from the immoral acts and homosexual demands of the [Bagandan] ruler, Mwanga.

Mwanga was a superstitious pagan king who originally was tolerant of Catholicism. However, his chief assistant, Katikiro, slowly convinced him that Christians were a threat to his rule. The premise was if these Christians would not bow to him, nor make sacrifices to their pagan god, nor pillage, massacre, nor make war, what would happen if his whole kingdom converted to Catholicism?

When Charles was sentenced to death, he seemed very peaceful, one might even say, cheerful. He was to be executed by being burnt to death. While the pyre was being prepared, he asked to be untied so that he could arrange the sticks. He then lay down upon them. When the executioner said that Charles would be burned slowly so death, Charles replied by saying that he was very glad to be dying for the True Faith. He made no cry of pain but just twisted and moaned, “Kotanda! (O my God!).” He was burned to death by Mwanga’s order on June 3, 1886. Pope Paul VI canonized Charles Lwanga and his companions on June 22, 1964. We celebrate his memorial on June 3rd of the Roman Calendar. Charles is the Patron of the African Youth of Catholic Action.

– Source: iBreviary

“John Chrysostom – Easter Sermon (Paschal Homily)”

Descen into Hadies
Descen into Hadies – Fr. Andrew Tregubov

 – Source: Fr. Andrew Tregubov Portfolio | Icons and Wall-Paintings

“John Chrysostom – Easter Sermon (Paschal Homily)” preached by Fr. Rhone Lillard, FSSP on Saturday, Easter Vigil 4/4/15, 6 pm: Sacred Heart Chapel, Easter Vigil Mass.
A fine statement of faith in Christ’s resurrection, often heard at Easter (Pascha) in Orthodox Churches

Devout and God-loving people, enjoy this kind and bright festival. Wise people, come and share joy with your Lord. You who have laboured in fasting, receive your deserved reward.

You who have laboured from the first hour, come to the festival now! You who came at the third hour, rejoice! You who lingered until the sixth hour, celebrate! You who came at the ninth hour, do not be sad! You who managed to come only at the eleventh hour, do not be dismayed by your lateness. No-one will be deprived of heavenly joy.

For our Lord is generous. He welcomes those who come last in the same way as those who come first. He is grateful to the first and rejoices in the last. He consoles those who came at the last hour, as if they had laboured from the first hour. He gives to everyone: those who laboured and those who wanted to labour. He receives the service and kisses the intention.

He values the deed and praises the desire. All of you enter into the joy of the Lord: First and last, receive the reward! Wealthy and poor, rejoice with one another! Diligent and lazy, celebrate the festival! Those who have fasted and those who have not, be glad together.

The feast is abundant, eat your fill! All of you enjoy the wealthy banquet of the faith and mercy of God. Let no-one go away hungry or offended. Let no-one be sad about their poverty, for the kingdom is now here for everyone.

Let no-one weep over their sins, for forgiveness for all has burst with light from the grave. Let no-one be afraid of death, for the death of Jesus has freed us all.

Embraced by death, He subdued death. Having descended into hell, He took hell captive. He embittered it when it tasted of his flesh.

Isaiah prophesied: “Hell was troubled, having met You in the underworld!” Hell was in mourning, for it was abolished! Hell was distressed, for it was condemned! Hell was impoverished, for it was deposed! Hell was destroyed, for it was bound!

It took on a body, and touched God. It took on the earth, and met heaven. It took what it saw, and fell to where it did not expect! Death! Where is your sting? Hell! Where is your victory? Christ is risen, and you are brought down. Christ is risen, and the demons have fallen. Christ is risen, and the angels rejoice. Christ is risen, and life triumphs. Christ is risen, and there are no dead in the grave. Christ has risen from the dead, become the firstborn of those who sleep and set into motion the resurrection of all. To Him be glory now and forever. Amen! – Source: http://www.earlychurchtexts.com/public/john_chrysostom_easter_sermon.htm

The Paschal homily or sermon (also known in Greek as Hieratikon or as the Catechetical Homily) of St John Chrysostom (d. 407 CE) is read aloud on the morning of Pascha (a.k.a. “Easter” in the West), called “the Great and Holy Pascha of our Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ” in the Eastern Orthodox Church and Eastern Catholic Churches of the Byzantine rite. According to the Tradition of the Church, no one sits during the reading of the Paschal homily. Portions of it are often done with the interactive participation of the congregation. – Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paschal_Homily.

Cf. The Paschal Sermon | oca.org.


Cf. Easter Homily by St. John Chrysostom | EWTN