The Roman Catholic Military Ordinariate of Canada’s Document on Chapter Eight of #AmorisLaetitia is full of #AmorisLaetitia’s Poison

+ Most Reverend Scott C. McCaig, C.C.
Bishop of the Military Ordinariate of Canada

The article, Canadian dioceses clarify Pope’s teaching on marriage by Deborah Gyapong, Monday, 13 March 2017 | The B.C. Catholic reported that:

Two more Canadian dioceses have joined the Alberta and Northwest Territories Bishops in issuing guidelines on Communion for the divorced and civilly remarried.

Like their western Canadian counterparts, the Archdiocese of Ottawa and the Military Ordinariate of Canada have responded to the controversial chapter eight of Pope Francis’ post-synodal Apostolic Exhortation Amoris Laetitia by interpreting it in light of the Church’s constant teaching on the indissolubility of marriage and her discipline on the reception of the sacraments.

This is far from being true. The document itself On the Implementation of Chapter Eight of the Apostolic Exhortation Amoris Laetitia in the Military Ordinariate of Canada is full of Amoris Laetitia‘s poison. Read on:

For Those Unable to Separate: Continence

Those divorced and civilly remarried couples who for serious reasons cannot separate, in order to receive absolution in confession which would open the way to receiving Communion, must take on the duty to live in complete continence:

Reconciliation in the sacrament of Penance which would open the way to the Eucharist, can only be granted to those who, repenting of having broken the sign of the Covenant and of fidelity to Christ, are sincerely ready to undertake a way of life that is no longer in contradiction to the indissolubility of marriage. This means, in practice, that when, for serious reasons, such as for example the children’s upbringing, a man and a woman cannot satisfy the obligation to separate, they “take on themselves the duty to live in complete continence, that is, by abstinence from the acts proper to married couples.”xi

The Prefect of the Congregation for the Faith, Cardinal Müller, recently stated that this requirement, “is not dispensable, because it is not only a positive law of John Paul II, but he expressed an essential element of Christian moral theology and the theology of the sacraments.”xii

The Apostolic Exhortation recognizes the difficulties inherent in couples living together in continence (cf. AL note 329) and insists that human frailty must be taken into account:

Perhaps out of a certain scrupulosity, concealed beneath a zeal for fidelity to the truth, some priests demand of penitents a purpose of amendment so lacking in nuance that it causes mercy to be obscured by the pursuit of a supposedly pure justice. For this reason, it is helpful to recall the teaching of Saint John Paul II, who stated that the possibility of a new fall “should not prejudice the authenticity of the resolution” (AL, Note 364)

Although this practice has been formally recognized as a valid pastoral solution since the time of the publication of the Apostolic Exhortation Familiaris Consortio, it is still an example of an extraordinary circumstance which will be examined in greater detail in the next section.

IV. Extraordinary Circumstances

Special Consideration

Required Having established the ordinary discipline of the Church, it is now possible to examine extraordinary pastoral situations with much greater precision. These require special consideration precisely because, for one reason or another, the pastoral situation differs in important respects from those envisioned by the ordinary discipline of the Church. As Pope Francis stated, “While upholding a general rule, it is necessary to recognize that responsibility with respect to certain actions and decisions is not the same in all cases” (AL 302).

The Help of the Sacraments

In very specific situations the Church’s help for those in irregular situations can include the help of the sacraments (AL, note 351). The conditions indicated in Amoris Laetitia for such a pastoral exception to the ordinary discipline of the Church (as declared in Can. 915, CCEO, Can. 855) are as follows: 8

The Law of Gradualness

1. First, the “law of gradualness” must be applied. With this moral principle we have the recognition that the fullness of God’s life-giving law must always be our aim, but also that moral conversion is often a slow and gradual process:

“…the law is itself a gift of God which points out the way, a gift for everyone without exception; it can be followed with the help of grace, even though each human being “advances gradually with the progressive integration of the gifts of God and the demands of God’s definitive and absolute love in his or her entire personal and social life” (AL 295).

From a ministerial point of view this moral principle requires that when facing difficult and irregular situations we must be “merciful and helpful”, patiently guiding and assisting people to advance, at whatever pace they require, toward the fullness of God’s law and loving design:

“… all these situations require a constructive response seeking to transform them into opportunities that can lead to the full reality of marriage and family in conformity with the Gospel. These couples need to be welcomed and guided patiently and discreetly”. That is how Jesus treated the Samaritan woman (cf. Jn. 4:1-26): he addressed her desire for true love, in order to free her from the darkness in her life and to bring her to the full joy of the Gospel” (AL 294).

What is critical to note is that “this is not a gradualness of the law” (AL 295). We are not speaking of accepting an irregular situation as normative:

Naturally, if someone flaunts an objective sin as if it were part of the Christian ideal, or wants to impose something other than what the Church teaches, he or she can in no way presume to teach or preach to others; this is a case of something which separates from the community (cf. Mt 18:17). Such a person needs to listen once more to the Gospel message and its call to conversion (AL 297).

Practically this means that there must be a firm purpose of amendment; the intention on the part of the recipient of Penance or Holy Communion to bring their lives into full conformity with the Gospel, even though there may be grave circumstances that presently prevent this.

Absence of Mortal Sin

2. Secondly, the person in this objectively irregular situation must not be in the state of mortal sin. Amoris Laetitia, quoting the Catechism of the Catholic Church (articles 1735 & 2352), insists that “a negative judgment about an objective situation does not imply a judgment about the imputability or culpability of the person involved” (AL 302). Due to serious mitigating factors it is possible that someone be in an objectively sinful situation and yet not be in the subjective state of mortal sin:

The Church possesses a solid body of reflection concerning mitigating factors and situations. Hence it can no longer simply be said that all those in any “irregular” situation are living in a state of mortal sin and are deprived of sanctifying grace (AL 301).

Once again it is incumbent upon the minister to accompany the person in question to gain a true picture of the full pastoral situation:

Consequently, there is a need “to avoid judgements which do not take into account the complexity of various situations” and “to be attentive, by necessity, to how people experience distress because of their condition” (AL 296).

Danger of Further Harm

3. Finally, there must be a grave pastoral reason why embracing the ordinary discipline of the Church would only cause further harm. Several examples of such grave situations are specifically mentioned in the exhortation:

One thing is a second union consolidated over time, with new children, proven fidelity, generous self-giving, Christian commitment, a consciousness of its irregularity and of the great difficulty of going back without feeling in conscience that one would fall into new sins. The Church acknowledges situations “where, for serious reasons, such as the children’s upbringing, a man and woman cannot satisfy the obligation to separate.” There are also the cases of those who made every effort to save their first marriage and were unjustly abandoned, or of “those who have entered into a second union for the sake of the children’s upbringing, and are sometimes subjectively certain in conscience that their previous and irreparably broken marriage had never been valid”. Another thing is a new union arising from a recent divorce, with all the suffering and confusion which this entails for children and entire families, or the case of someone who has consistently failed in his obligations to the family (AL 298).

When Continence is not Feasible

Ordinarily, receiving the sacraments for those in an irregular situation requires continence, but there are extreme situations wherein abstaining from conjugal relations is not feasible. Below is a succinct explanation of just such a situation and the underlying moral principles involved:

The situation foreseen here is apparently that of one party desiring such abstinence [as required by the Church for those divorced and civilly remarried without a decree of nullity] but the other refusing and threatening dire consequences in the absence of conjugal life. The first party then agrees to sexual relations against his or her will, for example, to preserve the welfare of the children. In such cases, the practicing Catholic party may not be guilty of serious sin and could therefore, in some cases, be admitted to the sacraments of reconciliation and the Eucharist. This case, it should be noted, could be treated in such a manner even before Amoris Laetitia, according to application of 10 the standard principles of moral theology and confessional practice, analogous to the determination of the moral culpability of contraception when the spouses do not agree.xiii

As noted, these were already accepted foundational principles of moral theology and confessional practice. The application of these principles explicitly to the divorced and civilly remarried in a magisterial document is seen by some as an example of the authentic development of doctrine.

The Need for Pastoral Discernment

Considering the nature of these criteria it is unlikely to encounter a large number of these cases. It is possible, however, to imagine other circumstances in which they could apply. This only emphasizes the need for careful attention to, and discernment of, each individual situation.

To illustrate, the section “When Continence is not Feasible” ought to stand out. How is it that a divorced and civilly remarried couple [with one or both parties having valid prior marriage] can be said to engage in conjugal relations?

One also ought to see Kasper’s Pope Francis’ Proposal.

It is evident that Bishop McCaig is engaging in the now tried and tested modernists’ M.O. which is, state Catholic Doctrine/Teaching saying it is not changing, yet place a contrary doctrine or teaching alongside it.


[UPDATE: March 1, 2017]
LifeSiteNews article Canada’s military bishop reaffirms Catholic teaching on marriage in Amoris Laetitia guidelines by Lianne Laurence fails to uncover the insidious nature of Bp McCaig’s guidelines.

When they are Assembled at Armaged′don, it Behooves them to Choose A Side Wisely.

Pope Francis is allying himself with the international left. – THE AUSTRALIAN (Cf. here, PDF and here)

How Pope Francis Became the Leader of the Global Left By FRANCIS X. ROCCA | Dec. 22, 2016 – With the right on the rise, many progressives are looking to a pontiff who campaigns against inequality and climate change – PDF



Tel megido.JPG
Aerial view of Tel Megiddo from the south east By Created by משתמש:אסף.צ uploaded Daniel.baranek – he-wiki, Public Domain

About Mageddo or [Battle of] Megiddo [(609 BC)] or in Hebrew Armaged′don

[The] Battle of Megiddo is recorded as having taken place in 609 BC when Pharaoh Necho II of Egypt lead his army to Carchemish (northern Syria) to join with his allies, the fading Neo-Assyrian Empire, against the surging Neo-Babylonian Empire. This required passing through territory controlled by the Kingdom of Judah. Judaean King Josiah refused to let the Egyptians pass, perhaps thinking that the Assyrians and Egyptians were weakened by the death of the pharaoh Psamtik I only a year earlier (610 BCE) and also attempting to help the Babylonians.[2 Kgs 23:29] The Judaean forces battled the Egyptians at Megiddo, resulting in Josiah’s death and his Kingdom becoming a vassal state of Egypt. The battle is recorded in the Bible, the Greek 1 Esdras, and the writings of Josephus. – Battle of Megiddo (609 BC) | Wikipedia


RSVCE Footnote Rv 16.16 Armageddon: i.e., Megiddo where Josiah was defeated by the king of Egypt, cf. 2 Kings 23.29.


Finally early in the seventh century Josias tried to bar near Mageddo the advance of the Pharao Nechao towards Mesopotamia and “was slain when he had seen him” (2 Kings 23:29-30; 2 Chronicles 35:22; Jos., “Ant.”, X, v, i; Max Müller, “Mittheil. d. Vorderas. Gesell.”, III, 1898, p. 56; but against cf. Zimmern and Winckler, “Die Keilin. und A. T.”, 105, who follow Herodotus, II, clix). The mourning for this calamity became proverbial (Zechariah 12:11). The warlike reputation of Mageddo is perhaps confirmed by Apocalypse 16:16. – Catholic Encyclopedia > M > Mageddo


Choose A Side Wisely

In the two battles of the end [second one in Rv 20] a side must be chosen wisely. The devout King Josiah, having disregarded God’s word through prophet Jeremiah and making his own interpretation on the word of God, chose wrongly and paid for it with his life. In the upcoming assembling at Armageddon the Babylonians are doomed and will finally be defeated definitively.


Cf. The WAR: The earthly city, mystery Babylon vs. the heavenly city, Jerusalem


“Io ho la sensazione che il mio pontificato sarà breve… 4-5 anni”. – Papa Francesco, 80 anni amari. In Vaticano è sempre più sotto attacco | IlFattoQuotidiano.it / BLOG / di Marco Politi | 17 dicembre 2016

Robert Cardinal Sarah: Don’t expect God to pour out his #DivineMercy on us should we choose to remain in sin


Dives in Misericordia (30 November 1980) | John Paul II
Dives in Misericordia (30 November 1980) | John Paul II

13. The Church Professes the Mercy of God and Proclaims It

[…]

Mercy in itself, as a perfection of the infinite God, is also infinite. Also infinite therefore and inexhaustible is the Father’s readiness to receive the prodigal children who return to His home. Infinite are the readiness and power of forgiveness which flow continually from the marvelous value of the sacrifice of the Son. No human sin can prevail over this power or even limit it. On the part of man only a lack of good will can limit it, a lack of readiness to be converted and to repent, in other words persistence in obstinacy, opposing grace and truth, especially in the face of the witness of the cross and resurrection of Christ.

Therefore, the Church professes and proclaims conversion. Conversion to God always consists in discovering His mercy, that is, in discovering that love which is patient and kind as only the Creator and Father can be; the love to which the “God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” is faithful to the uttermost consequences in the history of His covenant with man; even to the cross and to the death and resurrection of the Son. Conversion to God is always the fruit of the” rediscovery of this Father, who is rich in mercy.

[…]

Una riflessione su san Pietro, il primo Vicario di Cristo pentimento san Pietro di Cristina Siccardi 22 giugno 2016 | Corrispondenza Romana

Una riflessione su san Pietro, il primo Vicario di Cristo pentimento san Pietro di Cristina Siccardi 22 giugno 2016 | Corrispondenza Romana

Simon Pietro è colui che prende la spada per tagliare l’orecchio del servo del sommo sacerdote, ma Cristo lo rimprovera: «Rimetti la tua spada nel fodero; non devo forse bere il calice che il Padre mi ha dato?» (Gv 18, 11). Cefa, di propria iniziativa, pensa di agire per il bene, ma questo non è il ruolo della Chiesa perché essa è tenuta a servire soltanto la volontà di Dio per la sua Gloria e per il bene delle anime.

In the Advent of #AmorisLaetitia, Providential and Apt Third Sunday of Easter Readings (OF)

Awe inspring, amazing, providential and apt Third Sunday of Easter Readings (OF) that contain counsels, encouragement, consolations, and warnings.

Thanks be to God!

I recall leading up to and during the Synod on the Family in 2015, some sharp minds noticed this as well.

Even though the LORD appears asleep, he is telling us not be afraid, he is in charge.

In the Advent of Amoris Laetitia, the providential and apt Third Sunday of Easter Readings (OF):

FIRST READING Acts 5:27-32, 40b-41

To those saying we must assent to Pope Francis’ Exhortation and his novel [as characterized by Card. Schönborn & Fr. Lombardi] teaching, the first Pope, St. Peter gives us the response we are to give, ‘we must obey God rather than men.’ And if we are made to suffer doing so, ‘we are to rejoice for having been found worthy to suffer dishonor for the sake of the name.’

RESPONSORIAL PSALM 30:2, 4, 5-6, 11-12, 13

The whole Psalm is just beautiful and self-explanatory:

Exaltabo te, Domine, quoniam extravisti me.

R. (2a) I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me. or: R. Alleluia.
I will extol you, O LORD, for you drew me clear
and did not let my enemies rejoice over me.
O LORD, you brought me up from the netherworld;
you preserved me from among those going down into the pit.
R. I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me. or: R. Alleluia.
Sing praise to the LORD, you his faithful ones,
and give thanks to his holy name.
For his anger lasts but a moment;
a lifetime, his good will.
At nightfall, weeping enters in,
but with the dawn, rejoicing.
R. I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me. or: R. Alleluia.
Hear, O LORD, and have pity on me;
O LORD, be my helper.
You changed my mourning into dancing;
O LORD, my God, forever will I give you thanks.
R. I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me. or: R. Alleluia.

SECOND READING Revelation 5:11-14

Even our enemies [every creature … on earth and under the earth and in the sea] will also cry out: “To the one who sits on the throne and to the Lamb be blessing and honor, glory and might, forever and ever.”

The nations have sunk into a pit of their own making,
they are caught by the feet in the snare they set them selves
The LORD has made himself known, has given judgement, he has trapped the wicked in the work of their own hands. – Ps 9:15-16

GOSPEL (Long Form) John 21:1-19

1) An examination of conscience [the irony] for Pope Francis:

Jesus:

“Pope Francis, do you love me more than these?” If yes, then “Feed my lambs.”

“Pope Francis, do you love me?” If yes, then “Tend my sheep.”

“Pope Francis, do you love me?” If yes, then “Feed my sheep.”

2) And the net is full with 153 large fish and it does not break: despite the defectors, the number of the elect is full [we have to pray to be counted among them] and united in single doctrine. [Cf. St. Augustine, Commentary on St. John and St. John Chrysostom, Homilies on St. Matthew, 48]

In Coena Domini Mass 2016.03.24, Pope Francis: “Do as I say, not as I do!”

The Teacher and LORD: “I have given you an example, that you also should do as I have done to you.” – Jn 13:15 (RSVCE)

His Vicar: “Do as I say, not as I do!”


Do as I say:

The Pope decrees that not only men may be chosen for the washing of the feet in the Liturgy of Holy Thursday, Vatican City, Thursday, 21 January 2016 (VIS)

Not as I do!:

The Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi, said the Vatican norms are meant for traditional liturgies in Catholic communities, not necessarily a unique papal Mass where the overall message is one of universal brotherhood and the love of God for all his children.

“We must always take the pastoral context into account,” Lombardi said in an email. “Norms that are appropriate for a parish celebration aren’t to be considered binding on a very unique celebration of the pope in a refugee center with a non-Christian majority.” – Pope Washes Feet of Muslim Migrants, Says ‘We Are […] by LUIGI NAVARRO AND NICOLE WINFIELD, ASSOCIATED PRESS, CASTELNUOVO DI PORTO, Italy — Mar 24, 2016, 5:16 PM ET

… on the very day his supposed Teacher and LORD, whose Vicar he is, who having loved his own who were in the world and loving them to the end said to them:

If I then, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet. For I have given you an example, that you also should do as I have done to you.Jn 13:14-15 (RSVCE)


Who does the pope love, who are his own in the world?

Related: #CardinalBergoglio washes the feet of an unidentified woman on Holy Thursday at the Buenos Aires’ Sarda maternity hospital on March 24, 2005.