Who exactly are viri probati? – That they are “tested MARRIED men” is a pure invention by the innovators.

Where does the term viri probati appear in Church documents?

The term viri probati appears in Caput III, 20, in Constitutio Dogmatica de Ecclesia Lumen Gentium, a Vatican II document.

  1. […]

Constituerunt itaque huius modi viros ac deinceps ordinationem dederunt, ut cum decessissent, ministerium eorum alii viri probati exciperent.(42) Cf. S. CLEMENS ROM., Ad Cor. 44, 2: ed. FUNK, 1, p. 154s.)  […]

The English translation being [cf. Lumen Gentium – EN]

  1. […]

They therefore appointed such men, and gave them the order that, when they should have died, other approved men would take up their ministry.(6*) S. Clem. Rom., ad Cor. 44, 2; ed. Funk, I, p. 154 s. […]

The footnote references the only genuine writing of Pope St. Clement I, the fourth pope, which is a letter to the Church of Corinth.

Pope St. Clement I

In Chapter 44. The Ordinances of the Apostles, that There Might Be No Contention Respecting the Priestly Office, the saintly pope writes:

Our apostles also knew, through our Lord Jesus Christ, that there would be strife on account of the office of the episcopate. For this reason, therefore, inasmuch as they had obtained a perfect fore-knowledge of this, they appointed those [ministers] already mentioned, and afterwards gave instructions, that when these should fall asleep, other approved men should succeed them in their ministry. We are of opinion, therefore, that those appointed by them, or afterwards by other eminent men, with the consent of the whole church, and who have blamelessly served the flock of Christ, in a humble, peaceable, and disinterested spirit, and have for a long time possessed the good opinion of all, cannot be justly dismissed from the ministry. For our sin will not be small, if we eject from the episcopate those who have blamelessly and holily fulfilled its duties. Blessed are those presbyters who, having finished their course before now, have obtained a fruitful and perfect departure [from this world]; for they have no fear lest any one deprive them of the place now appointed them. But we see that you have removed some men of excellent behaviour from the ministry, which they fulfilled blamelessly and with honour. –  Fathers of the Church > Letter to the Corinthians (Clement) – http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/1010.htm [cf. also http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/anf01.ii.ii.xliv.html | Christian Classics Ethereal Library (CCEL)]

From these two Church documents, nowhere does it appear that viri probati [= approved men] means “tested MARRIED men”

So when and how did viri probati come to mean “tested MARRIED men”?

From these web articles What is viri probati? A proposal for extreme situations, which did not advance | ROME REPORTS and VIRI PROBATI DicEc, it is appears the idea was floated as such within the Second Vatican Council and got nowhere and it was post-Vatican II that viri probati became a “technical” expression for married men, potential candidates for priestly ordination, witnesses of a mature and contrasted Christian life [Google translated].

Conclusion

Clearly then what Church Teaching and Tradition means by viri probati, that is, approved men who are to be successively chosen to continue the ministry of the Holy Orders after those who appointed them have died, is not what the innovators have co-opted to mean “tested MARRIED men”.

This has nothing to do with “salus animarum” criteria or solving a shortage of priest in certain areas, but everything to do with the attempted destruction of the Holy Orders and of the Church.

This seems to be a to-do on Pope Francis’ very disturbing and destructive agenda and he has floated the idea before, as he is wont to do, via an interview in 2014 [cf. Pope says married men could be ordained – if world’s bishops agree by Christa Pongratz-Lippitt, 10 April 2014 | The Tablet], only in the latest interview, he doesn’t mention the bishops being in agreement, perhaps having learned from the Synods on the Family in 2014 & 2015.

(All emphases mine)




“I saw a great power rise up against the Church. It plundered, devastated, and threw into confusion and disorder the vine of the Lord, having it trampled underfoot by the people and holding it up to ridicule by all nations. Having vilified celibacy and oppressed the priesthood, it had the effrontery to confiscate the Church’s property and to arrogate to itself the powers of the Holy Father, whose person and whose laws it held in contempt.

– Jeanne le Royer (Sister of the Nativity), born in 1731 and became a nun in 1755. | Catholic Prophecy by Yves Dupont

Very Apt Prayers and Readings in the Liturgy of the Solemnity of PETER AND PAUL June 29 Mass During the Day

PETER AND PAUL Solemnity June 29 Mass During the Day

COLLECT
O God, who on the Solemnity of the Apostles Peter and Paul
give us the noble and holy joy of this day,
grant, we pray, that your Church
may in all things follow the teaching
of those through whom she received
the beginnings of right religion.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.

FIRST READING Acts 12:1-11
In those days, King Herod laid hands upon some members of the Church to harm them.
He had James, the brother of John, killed by the sword,
and when he saw that this was pleasing to the Jews
he proceeded to arrest Peter also.
–It was the feast of Unleavened Bread.–
He had him taken into custody and put in prison
under the guard of four squads of four soldiers each.
He intended to bring him before the people after Passover.
Peter thus was being kept in prison,
but prayer by the Church was fervently being made
to God on his behalf.
[…]
Then Peter recovered his senses and said,
“Now I know for certain
that the Lord sent his angel
and rescued me from the hand of Herod
and from all that the Jewish people had been expecting.”

RESPONSORIAL PSALM Ps. 34:2-3, 4-5, 6-7, 8-9

R. The angel of the Lord will rescue those who fear him.

SECOND READING 2 Tm 4:6-8, 17-18
I, Paul, am already being poured out like a libation,
and the time of my departure is at hand.
I have competed well; I have finished the race;
I have kept the faith.

From now on the crown of righteousness awaits me,
which the Lord, the just judge,
will award to me on that day, and not only to me,
but to all who have longed for his appearance.

The Lord stood by me and gave me strength,
so that through me the proclamation might be completed
and all the Gentiles might hear it.
And I was rescued from the lion’s mouth.
The Lord will rescue me from every evil threat
and will bring me safe to his heavenly Kingdom.
To him be glory forever and ever. Amen.

ALLELUIA Matt. 16:18
Tu es Petrus, et super hanc petram aedificabo Ecclesiam meam, et portae inferi non prevalebunt adversus eam.
You are Peter and upon this rock I will build my church,
and the gates of the netherworld shall not prevail again it.

GOSPEL Mt 16:13-19
[…]
He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?”
Simon Peter said in reply,
“You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.”
Jesus said to him in reply, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah.
For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my heavenly Father.
And so I say to you, you are Peter,
and upon this rock I will build my Church,
and the gates of the netherworld shall not prevail against it.
I will give you the keys to the Kingdom of heaven.
Whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven;
and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.”

PREFACE The twofold mission of Peter and Paul in the Church
[…]

For by your providence
the blessed Apostles Peter and Paul bring us joy:
Peter, foremost in confessing the faith,
Paul, its outstanding preacher,
Peter, who established the early Church from the remnant of Israel,
Paul, master and teacher of the Gentiles that you call.

PRAYER AFTER COMMUNION
Grant us, O Lord,
who have been renewed by this Sacrament,
so to live in the Church,
that, persevering in the breaking of the Bread
and in the teaching of the Apostles,
we may be one heart and one soul,
made steadfast in your love.
Through Christ our Lord.

SOLEMN BLESSING
May almighty God bless you,
for he has made you steadfast in Saint Peter’s saving confession
and through it has set you on the solid rock of the Church’s faith.
R. Amen.

And having instructed you
by the tireless preaching of Saint Paul,
may God teach you constantly by his example
to win brothers and sisters for Christ.
R. Amen.

[…]

June 29: Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul, Apostles

ss+peter+and+paul

Peter (d. 64?). St. Mark ends the first half of his Gospel with a triumphant climax. He has recorded doubt, misunderstanding and the opposition of many to Jesus. Now Peter makes his great confession of faith: “You are the Messiah” (Mark 8:29b). It was one of the many glorious moments in Peter’s life, beginning with the day he was called from his nets along the Sea of Galilee to become a fisher of men for Jesus.

The New Testament clearly shows Peter as the leader of the apostles, chosen by Jesus to have a special relationship with him. With James and John he was privileged to witness the Transfiguration, the raising of a dead child to life and the agony in Gethsemane. His mother-in-law was cured by Jesus. He was sent with John to prepare for the last Passover before Jesus’ death. His name is first on every list of apostles.

And to Peter only did Jesus say, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah. For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my heavenly Father. And so I say to you, you are Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church, and the gates of the nether world shall not prevail against it. I will give you the keys to the kingdom of heaven. Whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven; and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven” (Matthew 16:17b-19).

But the Gospels prove their own trustworthiness by the unflattering details they include about Peter. He clearly had no public relations person. It is a great comfort for ordinary mortals to know that Peter also has his human weakness, even in the presence of Jesus.

He generously gave up all things, yet he can ask in childish self-regard, “What are we going to get for all this?” (see Matthew 19:27). He receives the full force of Christ’s anger when he objects to the idea of a suffering Messiah: “Get behind me, Satan! You are an obstacle to me. You are thinking not as God does, but as human beings do” (Matthew 16:23b).

Peter is willing to accept Jesus’ doctrine of forgiveness, but suggests a limit of seven times. He walks on the water in faith, but sinks in doubt. He refuses to let Jesus wash his feet, then wants his whole body cleansed. He swears at the Last Supper that he will never deny Jesus, and then swears to a servant maid that he has never known the man. He loyally resists the first attempt to arrest Jesus by cutting off Malchus’s ear, but in the end he runs away with the others. In the depth of his sorrow, Jesus looks on him and forgives him, and he goes out and sheds bitter tears. The Risen Jesus told Peter to feed his lambs and his sheep (John 21:15-17).

Paul (d. 64?). If the most well-known preacher today suddenly began preaching that the United States should adopt Marxism and not rely on the Constitution, the angry reaction would help us understand Paul’s life when he started preaching that Christ alone can save us. He had been the most Pharisaic of Pharisees, the most legalistic of Mosaic lawyers. Now he suddenly appears to other Jews as a heretical welcomer of Gentiles, a traitor and apostate.

Paul’s central conviction was simple and absolute: Only God can save humanity. No human effort—even the most scrupulous observance of law—can create a human good which we can bring to God as reparation for sin and payment for grace. To be saved from itself, from sin, from the devil and from death, humanity must open itself completely to the saving power of Jesus.
Paul never lost his love for his Jewish family, though he carried on a lifelong debate with them about the uselessness of the Law without Christ. He reminded the Gentiles that they were grafted on the parent stock of the Jews, who were still God’s chosen people, the children of the promise.

In light of his preaching and teaching skills, Paul’s name has surfaced (among others) as a possible patron of the Internet.

– iBreviary – Sts. Peter and Paul

SS. Peter and Paul.
Pray for the Pope and pray for us.


Further Reference

“Saint Peter the Apostle“. CatholicSaints.Info. Wed, 29 June 2016.
“Saint Paul the Apostle“. CatholicSaints.Info. Wed, 29 June 2016.
The Saints > June 29 Peter and Paul | liturgies.net
SAINTS PETER AND PAUL 2016-06-28 FATHER DAVID NIX


A Letter from the Superior General by Fr. John Berg, FSSP, June 26, 2012


His Eminence Cardinal Robert Sarah’s Keynote Speech at the 12th Annual National Catholic Prayer Breakfast, Tue May 17, 2016 & The Prelate of Opus Dei Pastoral Letter, Thu December 1, 2016

Avonlee Photography 051716 NCPB Card Sarah -5
Cardinal Robert Sarah addressing the 13th annual National Catholic Prayer Breakfast
held at the Marriott Marquis Hotel in Washington DC

Cardinal Robert Sarah’s Keynote Speech at the 12th Annual National Catholic Prayer Breakfast, Tue May 17, 2016
Concluding Remarks

Before such a distinguished gathering, I offer three humble suggestions.

  1. First: Be prophetic. The Book of Proverbs tells us: “Where there is no vision, discernment, the people perish” (29, 18). Discern carefully – in your lives, your homes, your workplaces – how, in your nation, God is being eroded, eclipsed, liquidated. Blessed Paul VI saw that in 1968 when, for the Church, he so courageously wrote Humanae Vitae. What are the threats to Christian identity and the family today? ISIS, the growing influence of China, the colonization of ideologies such as gender? How do we react?
  1. Be faithful. This is my second suggestion. Specifically for you, as men and women called to influence even the political sphere you have a mission of bringing Divine Revelation to bear in the lives of your fellow citizens. Uphold the wise principles of your founding fathers. Do not be afraid to proclaim the truth with love, especially about marriage according to God’s plan, just as courageously as Saint John the Baptist, who risked his life to proclaim the truth. The battle to preserve the roots of mankind is perhaps the greatest challenge that our world has faced since its origins.[i] In the words of Saint Catherine of Siena: “Proclaim the truth and do not be silent through fear.”
  1. Third: Pray. Sometimes, in front of happenings in the world, our nation or even the Church, the results of our prayer might tempt us to become discouraged. Like Sisyphus in the Greek myth: condemned to roll a large boulder uphill, only to see it roll down again as soon as he had reached the top. Pope Benedict XVI in Deus Caritas Est  encourages us : “People who pray are not wasting their time, even though the situation appears desperate and seems to call for action alone.”[ii]

Whether in doctrine or morality or everyday decisions, the heart of prayer is to discern God’s will. This can only happen in prolonged moments of silence where, like Elijah before the horrendous threats of Queen Jezebel, we allow the “gentle breeze” of God to enlighten us and confirm us along our journey to do God’s will. Such was the virginal silence of the Blessed Mother. At a marriage, the wedding feast of Cana, when for a new family “they have no wine,” Mary our Mother trusted in the grace given by Jesus to bestow the joy of love overflowing – Amoris Lætitia. She pronounced her very last words, “Do whatever He tells you” (John 2: 1-12). Then she remained silent.

Be prophetic, Be faithful. Pray. That is why I came to this prayer breakfast. To encourage you. Be prophetic, Be faithful. And, above all, pray. These three suggestions make present that the battle for the soul of America, and the soul of the world, is primarily spiritual. They show that the battle is fought firstly with our own conversion to God’s will every day.

And so I wholly welcome this initiative, and join you in prayer that this great country may experience a new great “spiritual awakening”, and help stem the tide of evil that is spreading in the world. I am confident that your efforts will no doubt contribute to protecting human life, strengthening the family, and safeguarding religious freedom not only here in these United States, but everywhere in the world.

For in the end: it is “God or nothing.”
(My emphasis)

[i] Robert Cardinal Sarah, [“God or Nothing. A Conversation on Faith with Nicolas Diat” (San Francisco,
Ignatius Press, 2015)], 166.

[ii] Pope Benedict XVI, Encyclical Deus Caritas Est (25 December 2006), 36.



Cf. Why the Catholic Church is true: the Books of Maccabees



Bishop Javier Echevarría
Bishop Javier Echevarría
In office 1994—2016
b. Born 14 June 1932 d. 12 December 2016 (aged 84)
Pastoral Letter from the Prelate of Opus Dei, Bishop Javier Echevarría, December 1, 2016

“We are invited to turn our eyes to Christ, while recalling his terrestrial birth in Bethlehem and awaiting, also with joy and peace, his glorious coming at the end of time.”

Download in pdf format

My dear children: may Jesus watch over my daughters and sons for me!

After the close of the Year of Mercy, which has impacted the whole world, we are beginning Advent and a new liturgical year. The Church encourages us to quicken our pace towards our Lord. This advice is always timely, but now, in preparing for Christmas, it becomes if possible even more urgent.

We all have engraved on our hearts some words that, in the upcoming weeks, should leave their imprint on everything we do: veni, Domine, et noli tardare[1]; come Lord, and do not delay. We are invited to turn our eyes to Christ, while recalling his terrestrial birth in Bethlehem and awaiting, also with joy and peace, his glorious coming at the end of time. If we were to fail to make this effort, our daily occupations, the monotonous succession of days almost always the same, could perhaps make our daily path seem tedious and uninteresting, and undermine the expectation of an encounter with the Saviour.

Hence this marvelous cry of the Church: come, Lord Jesus! As Saint Bernard said, between the first and final advent comes an adventus medius, an intermediary coming of Christ, which marks the entire course of our existence. “This intermediary coming is, one could say, a path leading from the first to the last: in the first, Christ was our redemption; in the last, he will appear as our life; in this intermediary one he is our rest and our consolation.”[2]

In preparing ourselves for the imminent commemoration of Jesus’ birth in Bethlehem, these weeks spur us to realize how God draws close to us at each moment; he awaits us in the sacraments, especially Penance and the Eucharist, and equally in prayer, in the works of mercy. “Awaken! Remember that God comes! Not yesterday, not tomorrow, but today, now! The one true God, ‘the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob,’ is not a God who is there in Heaven, unconcerned about us and our history, but he is the-God-who-comes.”[3]

Each day of this waiting places us very close to Mary and Joseph, also with Simeon and Anna, and all the just of the Old Covenant who longed for the Messiah’s coming. Let us ponder on the yearnings in God’s heart (for his delight is to be with the children of men[4]) revealed in salvation history. How are we striving to respond? Let us turn our eyes more frequently to our Lady and the holy Patriarch, meditating on how they awaited, each day with greater eagerness, the birth of the Son of God. We can also reflect on how, during the months preceding this celestial event, their conversations would have revolved around Jesus. Our Father’s words are very timely here: “Joyfully keep Joseph and Mary company… and you will hear the traditions of the House of David. You will hear about Elizabeth and Zachary; you will be moved by Joseph’s pure love, and your heart will pound whenever they mention the Child who will be born in Bethlehem.”[5] I suggest that we try to put more love and affection into praying the Angelus.

In today’s world, both complex and exciting, the danger exists that the hustle and bustle around us will lead us, almost without noticing it, to lose our focus: to forget that our Lord is very close to us. Jesus gives himself to us completely, and it’s only natural that he asks a lot of us. Not understanding this reality means not understanding, not truly grasping the Love of God.

But let us not imagine unusual or extraordinary situations. Our Lord is waiting for us to make a more refined effort in carrying out the ordinary duties proper to a Christian. Therefore I suggest that these weeks (which in so many countries are marked by a crescendo of external preparations for Christmas) should lead to a crescendo of recollection in your closeness to God and in your generous and cheerful service to others. Amid the rushing around, the shopping (or the financial hardships, perhaps tied to a certain lack of social stability), amid wars or natural catastrophes, we have to remember that God is watching over us. Thus we will find peace of heart. Let us turn our eyes to Christ who is arriving, as the Pope said a few weeks ago, citing a well-known phrase of Saint Augustine: I fear that the Lord will pass by without my recognizing him; I fear that the Lord may pass before me in one of these small needy persons, and I will not realize that it is Jesus.”[6]

In particular, let us take greater care of the small gestures of piety that make our relationship with God warmer and more intimate, and that prepare for the Child Jesus a welcoming inn. For example, making the sign of the cross slowly, knowing we are welcomed by the Trinity and saved by the Cross; recollecting ourselves, with naturalness but with devotion, when saying the blessing or giving thanks at meals for our nourishment; showing by our genuflections before the “perennial Nativity scene of the Tabernacle”[7] the firmness of a real and living faith; accompanying almsgiving with a smile; greeting our Mother with affection in her images, and preparing during these first days of December for the solemnity of her Immaculate Conception… Amid the dryness of certain days, our Lady will place on our path fragrant flowers, filled with the bonus odor Christi[8], the “good aroma of Christ,” as happened in the apparitions of Our Lady of Guadalupe to Saint Juan Diego, which we will commemorate on the 12th of this month.

From December 17 on, the wait for Jesus takes on a holy impatience: He who is to come will come and will not delay, and now there will be no fear within our land, for he is our Saviour.[9] “When we hear tell of the birth of Christ, let us be silent and let the Child speak. Let us take his words to heart in rapt contemplation of his face. If we take him in our arms and let ourselves be embraced by him, he will bring us unending peace of heart. This Child teaches us what is truly essential in our lives. He was born into the poverty of this world; there was no room in the inn for him and his family. He found shelter and support in a stable and was laid in a manger for animals. And yet, from this nothingness, the light of God’s glory shines forth.”[10]

When our relationship with God takes on this serene and joyful air so proper to the stable at Bethlehem, there spreads around us, as its ripe fruit, a more intense family atmosphere overflowing with joy, so closely united to these dates. Therefore the Church urges us to better prepare our heart during Advent, and to set aside unimportant matters, distractions that lead us astray, the superficiality of the immediate… Perhaps we have in hand many concerns, and we lack peace in our relationship with God. If we strive to maintain our peace and calm with God, we will also offer it to others. The closer family life over the days of Christmas will not be marked by arguments, anger, impatience or frivolity, and we will enjoy relaxing and praying together, nourishing good times together as a family, and ironing out prejudices and small grudges that perhaps our heart may harbor.

Don’t be concerned if, despite our good will, we are sometimes attacked by distractions in our practices of piety. But let us struggle to acquire the supernatural and human fortitude needed to reject them. Let us renew perseveringly our eagerness to construct within ourselves a “living crêche” to welcome Jesus, spending time praying before the Nativity scene, although we may sometimes have the impression that our head is in the clouds. Recall then that Saint Josemaría was not discouraged to see himself like this in some of his moments spent before our Lord. In 1931 he wrote down: “I know a donkey of such poor character that, if he had been in Bethlehem next to the ox, instead of humbly adoring the Creator, he would have eaten the hay in the crib.”[11] Therefore, I am filled with joy to see that in many countries the Christian custom of setting up a Nativity scene is spreading.

Don’t forget to remember during these days people who are alone or in need, and whom we can assist in one way or another, knowing that we ourselves are the first beneficiaries. Try to spread this concern that is so Christian to relatives, friends, neighbors, colleagues. What a deeply Christian gesture, among many others, is the practice of some faithful of the Work who during some nights go to offer something to eat and drink to homeless persons, and also to those who are engaged in watching over the rest of the other citizens.

Before ending these lines, I would like to thank the Holy Father once again for the affection he showed me in the audience on November 7, and the blessing he imparted to the faithful and apostolates of the Prelature. Continue to pray for him and his intentions, with the firm hope that Christ, in the upcoming Christmas, will pour out his gifts abundantly on the Church, the Roman Pontiff, and the whole world.

And let us go with filial trust to our Lady during the days of the novena to the Immaculate Conception. Let us feel the holy pride of being children of such a good Mother, who places us face to face with Jesus, as Saint Josemaría told us. This will also spur us to joyfully increase our closeness to those who are sick. Don’t fail to meditate on the fatherly affection and closeness with which our Founder accompanied us already in the first Christmas celebrations in the history of the Work: alone with God, with Mary and Joseph; and with each of his daughters and sons who would come to Opus Dei.

With all my affection, I bless you, and ask you for more prayers, more fidelity.

Your Father,

+ Javier

Rome, December 1, 2016


[1] Liturgy of the Hours, Evening Prayer I for First Sunday of Advent.

[2] Saint Bernard, Discourse 5 on Advent, 1 (Liturgy of the Hours, Wednesday of the First Week of Advent, second reading).

[3] Benedict XVI, Homily, December 2, 2006.

[4] See Prov 8:31 (Vulg.).

[5] Saint Josemaría, Holy Rosary, second joyful mystery.

[6] Pope Francis, Address to a general audience, October 12, 2016 (see Saint Augustine, Sermon 88, 14, 13).

[7] Saint. Josemaría, (AGP, sec. A, leg. 3, fold. 3), cited in The Way, Critical-Historical Edition (Pedro Rodriguez, ed.)., Scepter (U.K.) 2009. Commentary on point 998.

[8] 2 Cor 2:15.

[9] Roman Misssal, December 19, Entrance Antiphon (see Heb 10:37).

[10] Pope Francis, Homily, December 24, 2015.

[11] Saint Josemaría, Apuntes íntimos, no. 181 (March 25, 1931). Cited in J.L. Soria, “Maestro de buen humor,”Rialp, 3rd ed., Madrid, 1994, p. 91.

#AmorisLaetitia: My Papa Offers Me A Mistress

From the unchanging Sacred Deposit of Faith [= Sacred Scripture + Holy Tradition], religious infidelity/idolatry is called immorality/fornication/adultery. The unchanging Sacred Deposit of Faith like God its Revealer does not change. When Israel committed idolatry [= playing the whore with demons/devils], even though they exchanged God, they did not change him.

Now a story about me and the wife of my youth:

I married the wife of my youth. She is pure, very beautiful, the mother of my children. She has been my companion and it has been wonderful together. She has been Mother showering me with such tender loving care.

At 11:30 AM on Friday, April 8, 2016 in Rome, a day which will live in infamy, my papa offered me a mistress saying I do not have to change my wife. My wife is still my wife, she does not, and she won’t change. Some of my uncles and aunties, some of my friends, and even some of my own brothers and sisters are telling me that the offer conditions by my papa are excellent and make it fine since my wife is not changing. To them, a tantalizingly very good offer not to be refused, they are envious. Oh, one more thing, the mistress is not attractive all! She is nothing compared to my wife, and can’t hold a candle to her, not even remotely, … and, she has been around the block … [doctrine of demons]

For All the New/Novel Doctrine in #AmorisLaetitia, Let Pope Francis Be Accursed!

For All the New/Novel Doctrine in Amoris Laetitia, Let Pope Francis be Accursed.

(What does this translate to canonically? That’s the question; and now, that should be the only question)

That Pope Francis Didn’t Change Doctrine is a red herring. The pope has taught new/novel doctrine. So says Card. Schönborn and Fr. Lombardi.

There Is No Other Gospel
6 I am astonished that you are so quickly deserting him who called you in the grace of Christ and turning to a different gospel—[a] 7 not that there is another gospel, but there are some who trouble you and want to pervert the gospel of Christ. 8 But even if we, or an angel from heaven, should preach to you a gospel contrary to that which we preached to you, let him be accursed. 9 As we have said before, so now I say again, If any one is preaching to you a gospel contrary to that which you received, let him be accursed.
10 Am I now seeking the favor of men, or of God? Or am I trying to please men? If I were still pleasing men, I should not be a servant[b] of Christ.[c] – Gal 1:6-10 (RSVCE)

Footnotes:
a. After the greeting there is no commendation, as was usual, but rather strong rebuke.
b. Galatians 1:10 Or slave
c. No doubt Paul was accused of exempting Gentile converts from the law of Moses in order to curry favor.

Example of a New/Novel Doctrine: With #AmorisLaetitia, Pope Francis Expands Kasper’s Proposal

And Canonist Dr. Edward Peters is in disbelief!

Dr. Edward Peters says:
12 April 2016 at 5:19 PM

I don’t think the import of AL fn. 329 has quite sunk in yet.

[It’s spectacular misuse of GS 51 sure has, at least with me and those who are paying attention. …]


Cf. #AmorisLaetitia: My Papa Offers Me A Mistress