Falsus in uno, falsus in omnibus. One may disregard Abp. Fernández’s entire defense of #AmorisLaetita’s Ch. VIII

Archbishop Victor Manuel Fernández, Titular Archbishop of Tiburnia, Rector de la Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina Santa Maria de los Buenos Aires [EN]

In his defense of Ch. VIII of Amoris Laetitia [translated in English: Chapter VIII of Amoris Laetitia: What is left after the storm | Victor Manuel Fernández], Abp. Fernández claimed that there have been recent changes [in] discipline regarding the divorced in new unions and went to state that:

1) “[T]he prohibition against funerals and any public funeral service” has changed without all the beliefs that supported that praxis falling away.

2) (Canon 2336[sic]) in the Code of Canon Law (1917): “If, spurning the admonition of the Ordinary, they stay in the illicit relationship, they are to be excommunicated according to the gravity of the deed or struck with personal interdict” is no longer in the current Code (1983).

Can 2356. Bigami, idest qui, obstante coniugali vinculo, aliud matrimonium, etsi tantum civile, ut aiunt, attentaverint, sunt ipso facto infames; et si, spreta Ordinarii monitione, in illicito contubernio persistant, pro diversa reatus gravitate excommunicentur vel personali interdicto plectantur.

In his article Clarifying what we can | In the Light of the Law A Canon Lawyer’s Blog, August 23, 2017, Dr. Edward Peters, JD, JCD, Ref. Sig. Ap. disputes these factual claims by Abp. Fernández and argues that:

1) [D]ivorced and ‘remarried’ Catholics are still recognized as figuring among those to whom ecclesiastical burial may be denied.

2) Catholics were not excommunicated under the 1917 Code for being divorced and remarried.

From the plain reading of the Canon 2336 2356 referenced by the Archbishop, it deals specifically with bigamy and the one twice married, and infamous for that very fact, faced the ecclesiastical sanctions of either excommunication or personal interdict only after disregarding the admonitions of the Ordinary and persisting in their bigamy.

This is very significant for the Archbishop to be just confused or mistaken when his truncated English profile reads [compared to the extensive one in Spanish]:

Archbishop Victor Manuel Fernandez holds a Doctorate Degree in Theology and has been the President of the Pontifical Catholic University of Argentina [UCA] since 2009. He was previously Dean of the School of Theology of UCA (2008-2009) and Chairman of the Argentine Theological Society (2007-2009). He is also member of the Pontifical Council for Culture since 2014.

Rev. Fernandez’s service to Higher Education and the Catholic Church is extensive and broader. He was in charge of a parish in Rio Cuarto, Cordoba, where he founded the Seminary, the Sacred Science Institute for Teachers, and the Lay Centre for continued faith formation. He also advised local movements and lay institutions, while providing support to catechetical and ecumenical education programs.

He participated in the 5th General Conference of the Episcopate of Latin America (2007) and was member of its Editorial Committee. He has been an expert in several commissions of the Argentine Conference of Catholic Bishops (Comision Espiscopal Argentina-CEA) and, since 2014, is member of the Commission for Faith and Culture. On that same year, for the 3rd Extraordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Pope Francis appointed Rev. Fernandez as Vice-president for the Message and member of the Editorial Commission in charge of the Report of the Synod entitled Relatio Synodi, on “Pastoral Challenges of the Family in the Context of Evangelization”. On September 2015, for the 14th Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, he was also member of the Editorial Commission in charge of the Report of the Synod on the topic of “Vocation and mission of families in the Church and the Contemporary World.”

Since July 2016, Rev. Fernandez is advisor of the Congregation for Catholic Education. He has more than 350 publications in books and articles both in international and national journals from Argentina, Latin American and Europe.

Since we are dealing with Canon Law and Archbishop Fernández – Rector of a Catholic University and with such extensive relevant educational background – has made false factual claims on which his defense is based, by invoking the venerable legal principle Falsus in uno, falsus in omnibus, one may disregard his entire defense of Ch. 8. of Amoris Laetitia.

Endnote

For those still wanting to consider the rest of the Archbishop’s defense, be warned that together with the false factual claims, the Archbishop will draw you into his  labyrinth by first questioning what the Church has never taught to be exceptions to the 5th and 7th Commandments [cf. CCC 2263 – 2267 and Catholic Encyclopedia > Theft] and proposing that they be considered as exceptions.

Conclusion

Abp. Fernández’s defense of Ch. 8. of Amoris Laetitia and his arguments contained therein are a non-starter.

It is clear that the Archbishop’s defense supports an agenda which is opposed to the Truth.


Cf. @Pontifex & Collaborators Moving to Render Can. 915 of the 1983 Code of Canon Law Irrelevant? Posted on October 7, 2017 by thewarourtime

Who exactly are viri probati? – That they are “tested MARRIED men” is a pure invention by the innovators.

Where does the term viri probati appear in Church documents?

The term viri probati appears in Caput III, 20, in Constitutio Dogmatica de Ecclesia Lumen Gentium, a Vatican II document.

  1. […]

Constituerunt itaque huius modi viros ac deinceps ordinationem dederunt, ut cum decessissent, ministerium eorum alii viri probati exciperent.(42) Cf. S. CLEMENS ROM., Ad Cor. 44, 2: ed. FUNK, 1, p. 154s.)  […]

The English translation being [cf. Lumen Gentium – EN]

  1. […]

They therefore appointed such men, and gave them the order that, when they should have died, other approved men would take up their ministry.(6*) S. Clem. Rom., ad Cor. 44, 2; ed. Funk, I, p. 154 s. […]

The footnote references the only genuine writing of Pope St. Clement I, the fourth pope, which is a letter to the Church of Corinth.

Pope St. Clement I

In Chapter 44. The Ordinances of the Apostles, that There Might Be No Contention Respecting the Priestly Office, the saintly pope writes:

Our apostles also knew, through our Lord Jesus Christ, that there would be strife on account of the office of the episcopate. For this reason, therefore, inasmuch as they had obtained a perfect fore-knowledge of this, they appointed those [ministers] already mentioned, and afterwards gave instructions, that when these should fall asleep, other approved men should succeed them in their ministry. We are of opinion, therefore, that those appointed by them, or afterwards by other eminent men, with the consent of the whole church, and who have blamelessly served the flock of Christ, in a humble, peaceable, and disinterested spirit, and have for a long time possessed the good opinion of all, cannot be justly dismissed from the ministry. For our sin will not be small, if we eject from the episcopate those who have blamelessly and holily fulfilled its duties. Blessed are those presbyters who, having finished their course before now, have obtained a fruitful and perfect departure [from this world]; for they have no fear lest any one deprive them of the place now appointed them. But we see that you have removed some men of excellent behaviour from the ministry, which they fulfilled blamelessly and with honour. –  Fathers of the Church > Letter to the Corinthians (Clement) – http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/1010.htm [cf. also http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/anf01.ii.ii.xliv.html | Christian Classics Ethereal Library (CCEL)]

From these two Church documents, nowhere does it appear that viri probati [= approved men] means “tested MARRIED men”

So when and how did viri probati come to mean “tested MARRIED men”?

From these web articles What is viri probati? A proposal for extreme situations, which did not advance | ROME REPORTS and VIRI PROBATI DicEc, it appears the idea was floated as such within the Second Vatican Council and got nowhere and it was post-Vatican II that viri probati became a “technical” expression for married men, potential candidates for priestly ordination, witnesses of a mature and contrasted Christian life [Google translated].

Conclusion

Clearly then what Church Teaching and Tradition means by viri probati, that is, approved men who are to be successively chosen to continue the ministry of the Holy Orders after those who appointed them have died, is not what the innovators have co-opted to mean “tested MARRIED men”.

This has nothing to do with “salus animarum” criteria or solving a shortage of priest in certain areas, but everything to do with the attempted destruction of the Holy Orders and of the Church.

This seems to be a to-do on Pope Francis’ very disturbing and destructive agenda and he has floated the idea before, as he is wont to do, via an interview in 2014 [cf. Pope says married men could be ordained – if world’s bishops agree by Christa Pongratz-Lippitt, 10 April 2014 | The Tablet], only in the latest interview, he doesn’t mention the bishops being in agreement, perhaps having learned from the Synods on the Family in 2014 & 2015.

(All emphases mine)


[UPDATE November 11, 2017]

“Francis Speaks About Abolishing Celibacy” | gloria.tv




Exclusive interview with Cdl. Raymond Burke – Part II. | 2017. szeptember 08. írta: Katolikus Válasz

Katolikus Válasz: One of the Hungarian bishops recently said that he is about to write a letter to Pope Francis asking him to allow the priestly consecration of ‘viri probati’ in the Latin Church. This has opened up a debate in the Hungarian Catholic Church about this issue and other possible solutions, including the abolishment of mandatory celibacy, to the shortage of priests in the Western world.

Do you think that ‘viri probati’ becoming priests will happen soon in the Latin Church? Can the Eastern Catholic or even the Orthodox practice be an example for the Latin Church?

Do you think that any form of relaxation in the mandatory priestly celibacy would be a good solution for the shortage of priests in the West? What is the main reason for the decline in the number of priestly vocations in the West, and what solution would you suggest to this problem?

Cdl. Burke: No, I do not anticipate any change in the Church’s discipline regarding priestly celibacy because of its roots in the example of Christ the High Priest, in whose person the ordained priest acts. It is my hope that only viri probati, in the sense in which Saint Clement of Rome first used the phrase, will be ordained, that is, men proven through an appropriate period of seminary formation. I do not anticipate the ordination of viri probati, in the sense of married men of proven virtue, according to a current use of the phrase, in the Roman Catholic Church.

The practice of the Eastern Churches regarding priestly celibacy must be understood thoroughly and deeply. It does not constitute an argument for a change in the discipline of the Latin Church. A relaxation of the discipline regarding priestly celibacy will not increase the number of vocations. A priestly vocation is a response to a divine call which includes the grace of celibacy or perpetual continence.

The reason for the lack of response to the priestly vocation is the loss of faith in our times and the lack of instruction of the young in the faith. God is certainly calling a sufficient number of young men to serve His Church. The worldliness of the culture in which we live makes it difficult for a man to hear the call.

Also, the failure of families, parish priests and other Christians to foster priestly vocations deprives those being called of an essential help in understanding and responding to the call.


“I saw a great power rise up against the Church. It plundered, devastated, and threw into confusion and disorder the vine of the Lord, having it trampled underfoot by the people and holding it up to ridicule by all nations. Having vilified celibacy and oppressed the priesthood, it had the effrontery to confiscate the Church’s property and to arrogate to itself the powers of the Holy Father, whose person and whose laws it held in contempt.

– Jeanne le Royer (Sister of the Nativity), born in 1731 and became a nun in 1755. | Catholic Prophecy by Yves Dupont