Pope St. John Paul II and his Exhortation Familiaris Consortio (November 22, 1981) a Stumbling Block to the Viri Probati Argument


Post-Vatican II, the innovators have co-opted the term viri probati, which in Church Teaching and Tradition refers to ‘approved men who are to be successively chosen to continue the ministry of the Holy Orders after those who appointed them have died’, to mean ‘tested married men, potential candidates for priestly ordination, witnesses of a mature and contrasted Christian life’.

If the viri probati are such tested married men, then their married life would be exemplary, and we would expect of them, for example, to have been married only once, and that they manage their children and their households well, and that they are also temperate, gentle, and live the virtue of poverty [cf. 1 Tim 3:1-13 (RSVCE)].

Most likely they are also fathers of large and poor families and spend their lives for their children and who with their effort and constancy — often without complaining of their needs — bring up their family, creating a cheerful home in which everyone learns to love, to serve and to work. [cf. The Virtue of Poverty | St. Josemaría Escrivá].

And finally, a clear sign of the holiness in the marriage of a true vir probatus [innovators’ definition] and his wife is precisely the joy with which they welcome and ask the Lord for vocations among their children. Their family will be open to transcendent values, and serve its brothers and sisters with joy, it will fulfil its duties with generous fidelity, and will be aware of its daily sharing in the mystery of the glorious Cross of Christ, becoming the primary and most excellent seedbed of vocations to a life of consecration to the kingdom of God” (Familiaris consortio, n. 53) [Cf. Apostolic Journey of His Holiness John Paul II to Rio de Janeiro, on the Occasion of the 2nd World Meeting for Families (October 2-6, 1997) | Mass in the Cathedral of St. Sebastian in Rio de Janeiro | Homily of John Paul II, 4 October 1997]. (My emphasis)

(What irony then that it is Brazilian bishops – with Pope Francis apparently in agreement – who are pushing for the ordination of viri probati [innovators’ definition] in remote, indigenous communities in the Amazon when the great and saintly pope spoke these words in Brazil).

Conclusion

If there are viri probati [innovators’ definition] in remote, indigenous communities in the Amazon or elsewhere, and if these viri probati are true, vocations to the priesthood and religious life would arise naturally from their holy families. There will be no need for the innovator bishops to presumptuously present such men for ordination.

Once again, the great and saintly Pope St. John Paul II and his Exhortation Familiaris consortio (November 22, 1981) are a stumbling block to the innovators and their wrecking plans.


“I saw a great power rise up against the Church. It plundered, devastated, and threw into confusion and disorder the vine of the Lord, having it trampled underfoot by the people and holding it up to ridicule by all nations. Having vilified celibacy and oppressed the priesthood, it had the effrontery to confiscate the Church’s property and to arrogate to itself the powers of the Holy Father, whose person and whose laws it held in contempt.

– Jeanne le Royer (Sister of the Nativity), born in 1731 and became a nun in 1755. | Catholic Prophecy by Yves Dupont


[UPDATE May 22, 2018]

TUESDAY, MAY 22, 2018 | Cardinal Sarah’s Homily to the Chartres Pilgrims by GREGORY DIPIPPO | New Liturgical Movement

Cardinal Sarah’s Homily at Conclusion of Chartres Pentecost Pilgrimage [English Subs] 21 May 2018 | Catholic Sat

Pope St. John Paul II Optional Memorial, October 22, Saturday of the Twenty-Ninth Week in Ordinary Time

Pope John Paul II is pictured in an image released March 25 by the postulation of his sainthood cause. The Polish pope, who died April 2, 2005, will be beatified May 1. (CNS photo/Grzegorz Galazka, courtesy of Postulation of Pope John Paul II) (March 28, 2011)
Pope John Paul II is pictured in an image released March 25 by the postulation of his sainthood cause. The Polish pope, who died April 2, 2005, will be beatified May 1. (CNS photo/Grzegorz Galazka, courtesy of Postulation of Pope John Paul II) (March 28, 2011)

POPE ST. JOHN PAUL II

Karol J. Wojtyla, known as John Paul II since his October 1978 election to the papacy, was born in Wadowice, a small city 50 kilometers from Cracow, on May 18, 1920. He was the second of two sons born to Karol Wojtyla and Emilia Kaczorowska. His mother died in 1929. His elder brother Edmund, a doctor, died in 1932 and his father, a non-commissioned army officer died in 1941.

He made his First Holy Communion at age 9 and was confirmed at 18. Upon graduation from Marcin Wadowita high school in Wadowice, he enrolled in Cracow’s Jagiellonian University in 1938 and in a school for drama.

The Nazi occupation forces closed the university in 1939 and young Karol had to work in a quarry (1940-1944) and then in the Solvay chemical factory to earn his living and to avoid being deported to Germany.

In 1942, aware of his call to the priesthood, he began courses in the clandestine seminary of Cracow, run by Cardinal Adam Stefan Sapieha, archbishop of Cracow. At the same time, Karol Wojtyla was one of the pioneers of the “Rhapsodic Theatre,” also clandestine.

After the Second World War, he continued his studies in the major seminary of Cracow, once it had re-opened, and in the faculty of theology of the Jagiellonian University, until his priestly ordination in Cracow on November 1, 1946.

Soon after, Cardinal Sapieha sent him to Rome where he worked under the guidance of the French Dominican, Garrigou-Lagrange. He finished his doctorate in theology in 1948 with a thesis on the topic of faith in the works of St. John of the Cross. At that time, during his vacations, he exercised his pastoral ministry among the Polish immigrants of France, Belgium, and Holland.

Source: iBreviary – Saint John Paul II


Optional Memorial of St. John Paul II – October 22, 2016 – Liturgical Calendar | Catholic Culture


Pope Saint John Paul II | CatholicSaints.Info

October, Month of the Holy Rosary: Words of Wisdom, Piety, and Filial Love from Popes St. John Paul II and Pius XI

rosary

john-paul-ii-praying-rosary

[…]

3. Among the several characteristic signs of Christian piety, devotion to the Virgin Mary occupies a very special place, corresponding to the condition of the Mother of God and our Mother. Like that woman in the Gospel who let out a cry of admiration and happiness for Jesus and his Mother, as you, with your love and your devotion you usually always uniting Mary to Jesus. You understand that the Virgin leads us to her divine Son and that these always hears the supplications who asked his mother. The eternal union of the Virgin Mary with her Son is a confidential sign and full of faith of her maternal mission, as well as a demonstration of the words addressed in Cana: “Do whatever he tells you” (Jn 2: 5). Mary always exhorts us to be faithful to the Gospel, as [she was]; His life was indeed a witness of fidelity to the word and the will of the Father.

[…]

5. […]

I wish to exhort you in a special way to pray the Rosary which is a source of deep Christian life. Try to recite it every day, alone or with your family, repeating with great faith the fundamental Christian prayers, which are the Lord’s Prayer, the Hail Mary and the Glory. Meditate scenes from the life of Jesus and Mary, which remind us of the mysteries of joy, sorrow and glory. You will learn as well in the joyful mysteries to think about Jesus who is poor and little did(sic): a baby! For us, to serve us, and you will feel compelled to serve others in their needs. In the sorrowful mysteries you will realize that to accept with docility and love the sufferings of life – like Christ in his passion -, it leads to happiness and the joy that is expressed in the glorious mysteries of Christ and of Mary, waiting for the eternal life.

[…]

John Paul > II Homilies 1987 > 5 April 1987, Liturgy of the Word with the faithful of “La Serena”, Chile [IT]

[…]

5. The rosary is a real interview with Mary, our heavenly Mother. In the Rosary we speak to Mary so that she may intercede for us with her Son Jesus. So we speak to God through Mary.

Get used, dear young people, to pray the rosary in this way. It is not so much to repeat the formulas, but rather to talk to people live on a living person, that if you do not see with the eyes of the body, but you can see with the eyes of faith . Mary, in fact, and his Son, Jesus, living in the sky a lot more “living life” of this our – mortal – that we live here on earth.

The rosary is a confidential conversation with Mary, a talk full of confidence and abandonment. It is a confide in our grief, a manifest them our hopes, our hearts an[d] open them. A declare to him for all that she, on behalf of his Son, we will ask. A promise faithfulness in every circumstance, even the most painful and difficult, sure of his protection, confident that, if we ask, she will always be there by her Son all the graces necessary for our salvation.

[…]

John Paul II > Speeches 1987 > April > To young people of the Living Rosary and members of the Philippine Medical Women’s Association (April 25, 1987) [IT]


Pope Pius XI
Pope Pius XI

[…]

13. In this regard, it is to be noted that both piety and love, though always renewing the same words, do not always repeat the same thing but always express something new issuing from the intimate sentiment of devotion. And besides, this mode of prayer has the perfume of evangelic simplicity and requires humility of spirit; and, if we disdain humility, as the Divine Redeemer teaches, it will be impossible for us to enter the heavenly kingdom: “Amen, I say to you, unless you become as little children you shall not enter the kingdom of heaven” (Matt. xviii, 3).

[….]

Pius XI > Encyclicals > Ingravescentibus Malis (September 29, 1937) [EN]

Came across these in In CONVERSATION with God Daily Meditation Volume Five Ordinary Time Weeks 24 – 34 Francis Fernandez TWENTY-SEVENTH WEEK: SATURDAY 36. PRAYERS TO THE MOTHER OF JESUS


Liturgical Year October, Month of the Holy Rosary | Catholic Culture


The Popes on the Rosary: University of Dayton, Ohio

Raymond Cardinal Burke Reflects on DIVINE MERCY & JUSTICE

Cardinal Burke has recently concluded a 5-part series reflection on DIVINE MERCY & JUSTICE in the wake of the publication of Pope Francis’ book: The Name of God Is Mercy. He notes at this time when there is a widespread discussion of mercy, he fears there is a risk of making Mercy a slogan which lacks a profound understanding of its meaning in the Church’s constant teaching and that various difficult situations in the Church today are easily dismissed by invoking God’s mercy.

He focuses his reflection on the teaching in Sacred Scripture as it has been interpreted by Saint Thomas Aquinas and Pope Saint John Paul II and hopes that this reflection, offered during the extraordinary year of Divine Mercy will confirm the readers in their  faith and in their service to the Church. 

He concludes by stating that Mercy does not constitute an easy response to the great challenges of the Christian life in the world, a response which may ignore the demands of justice. It constitutes rather the response which engages all of our intelligence and will, according to the plan of God for us and for our world.

DivineMercy-Justice

Part 1 Opening

Recently, Pope Francis published a book-length interview which is being distributed in six languages in more than 80 countries with the title: The Name of God Is Mercy. This publication and its wide distribution manifests how divine mercy is a central subject of discussion in the Church today.

The centrality of divine mercy is certainly not new in the Church’s teaching and pastoral practice, even though some today would give the impression that it is so. At the same time, the current widespread discussion of mercy risks making it a slogan lacking a profound understanding of its meaning in the Church’s constant teaching. Sadly, for example, one hears of various difficult situations in the Church today rather easily dismissed by invoking God’s mercy.

It is therefore important that we take up a serious consideration of the nature of God’s mercy as He has revealed it to us and as it has been taught in the Magisterium. To assist such reflection, I will concentrate my attention on the teaching in the Sacred Scripture as it has been interpreted by Saint Thomas Aquinas and Pope Saint John Paul II. Then, I will relate that teaching to the natural moral law.

It is my hope that my reflection, offered during the extraordinary year of Divine Mercy will confirm you in your faith and in your service to the Church.

Reflect on the 5 parts here: Catholic Action for Faith and Family Home / Resources / Articles | DEVOTION & PIETY


Cf. Mercy: A Call to Repentance, by Pete Jermann, October 3, 2016 | Crisis Magazine

The Innovators pretend to go to “the early days of the Church” when it suits them

What is it going to be?:

“the early days of the Church” e.g. “However, the Church reaffirms her practice, which is based upon Sacred Scripture, of not admitting to Eucharistic Communion divorced persons who have remarried.” [Cf. Familiaris Consortio, 84]

OR

“not to preserve everything as it has been of old.”


Kasper speaks about the further Church-reform plans of Pope Francis and his intention “not to preserve everything as it has been of old.” – Kasper: Pope Intends “Not to Preserve Everything as it has Been”, by Dr. Maike Hickson, April 23, 2016 | 1P5

VS.

Italian/Google Translate English (THE WAR welcomes a better translation)

Istituzione della Commissione di Studio sul Diaconato delle donne, 02.08.2016 Establishment of the Study Committee on the Diaconate of women, 02.08.2016
Il 12 maggio 2016 il Santo Padre, nel corso dell’incontro – svolto in forma di dialogo nell’Aula Paolo VI – con le partecipanti all’Assemblea Plenaria delle Superiore Generali, ha espresso l’intenzione di “costituire una commissione ufficiale che possa studiare la questione” del Diaconato delle donne, “soprattutto riguardo ai primi tempi della Chiesa”. The May 12, 2016 the Holy Father, during the meeting – held in the form of dialogue Aula Paolo VI – with the Plenary Assembly of Superiors General, has expressed its intention to “establish an official committee that can study the question “of the Diaconate of women,” especially with regard to the early days of the Church”.
Dopo intensa preghiera e matura riflessione, Sua Santità ha deciso di istituire la Commissione di Studio sul Diaconato delle donne, chiamando a farne parte i seguenti: After intense prayer and mature reflection, His Holiness has decided to set up the Commission to Study the diaconate of women, calling upon the following:
[…] […]

(My emphasis)


“especially with regard to the first ages of the Church.” – Pope institutes commission to study the diaconate of women | Vatican Radio


Cf. From the Diakonia of Christ to the Diakonia of the Apostles* | INTERNATIONAL THEOLOGICAL COMMISSION | vatican.va


Cf. Catholic Encyclopedia > D > Deaconesses


VI. WHO CAN RECEIVE THIS SACRAMENT?

CCC 1577 “Only a baptized man (vir) validly receives sacred ordination.”66 The Lord Jesus chose men (viri) to form the college of the twelve apostles, and the apostles did the same when they chose collaborators to succeed them in their ministry.67 The college of bishops, with whom the priests are united in the priesthood, makes the college of the twelve an ever-present and ever-active reality until Christ’s return. The Church recognizes herself to be bound by this choice made by the Lord himself. For this reason the ordination of women is not possible.68

66 CIC, can. 1024.
67 Cf. Mk 3:14-19; Lk 6:12-16; 1 Tim 3:1-13; 2 Tim 1:6; Titus 1:5-9; St. Clement of Rome, Ad Cor. 42,4; 44,3:PG 1,292-293; 300.
68 Cf. John Paul II, MD 26-27; CDF, declaration, Inter insigniores: AAS 69 (1977) 98-116.


4. Although the teaching that priestly ordination is to be reserved to men alone has been preserved by the constant and universal Tradition of the Church and firmly taught by the Magisterium in its more recent documents, at the present time in some places it is nonetheless considered still open to debate, or the Church’s judgment that women are not to be admitted to ordination is considered to have a merely disciplinary force.

Wherefore, in order that all doubt may be removed regarding a matter of great importance, a matter which pertains to the Church’s divine constitution itself, in virtue of my ministry of confirming the brethren (cf. Lk 22:32) I declare that the Church has no authority whatsoever to confer priestly ordination on women and that this judgment is to be definitively held by all the Church’s faithful.Ordinatio Sacerdotalis (May 22, 1994) | Pope St. John Paul II

(My emphasis)


Cf. Dr. Phyllis Zagano wouldn’t use the term “female deacons”; proceeds from “her fact that women were ordained to the office of deacon”, and hopes that after the study, the Holy Father will decide to restore women to the ordained diaconate

Robert Cardinal Sarah: Don’t expect God to pour out his #DivineMercy on us should we choose to remain in sin


Dives in Misericordia (30 November 1980) | John Paul II
Dives in Misericordia (30 November 1980) | John Paul II

13. The Church Professes the Mercy of God and Proclaims It

[…]

Mercy in itself, as a perfection of the infinite God, is also infinite. Also infinite therefore and inexhaustible is the Father’s readiness to receive the prodigal children who return to His home. Infinite are the readiness and power of forgiveness which flow continually from the marvelous value of the sacrifice of the Son. No human sin can prevail over this power or even limit it. On the part of man only a lack of good will can limit it, a lack of readiness to be converted and to repent, in other words persistence in obstinacy, opposing grace and truth, especially in the face of the witness of the cross and resurrection of Christ.

Therefore, the Church professes and proclaims conversion. Conversion to God always consists in discovering His mercy, that is, in discovering that love which is patient and kind as only the Creator and Father can be; the love to which the “God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” is faithful to the uttermost consequences in the history of His covenant with man; even to the cross and to the death and resurrection of the Son. Conversion to God is always the fruit of the” rediscovery of this Father, who is rich in mercy.

[…]