Raymond Cardinal Burke Reflects on DIVINE MERCY & JUSTICE

Cardinal Burke has recently concluded a 5-part series reflection on DIVINE MERCY & JUSTICE in the wake of the publication of Pope Francis’ book: The Name of God Is Mercy. He notes at this time when there is a widespread discussion of mercy, he fears there is a risk of making Mercy a slogan which lacks a profound understanding of its meaning in the Church’s constant teaching and that various difficult situations in the Church today are easily dismissed by invoking God’s mercy.

He focuses his reflection on the teaching in Sacred Scripture as it has been interpreted by Saint Thomas Aquinas and Pope Saint John Paul II and hopes that this reflection, offered during the extraordinary year of Divine Mercy will confirm the readers in their  faith and in their service to the Church. 

He concludes by stating that Mercy does not constitute an easy response to the great challenges of the Christian life in the world, a response which may ignore the demands of justice. It constitutes rather the response which engages all of our intelligence and will, according to the plan of God for us and for our world.

DivineMercy-Justice

Part 1 Opening

Recently, Pope Francis published a book-length interview which is being distributed in six languages in more than 80 countries with the title: The Name of God Is Mercy. This publication and its wide distribution manifests how divine mercy is a central subject of discussion in the Church today.

The centrality of divine mercy is certainly not new in the Church’s teaching and pastoral practice, even though some today would give the impression that it is so. At the same time, the current widespread discussion of mercy risks making it a slogan lacking a profound understanding of its meaning in the Church’s constant teaching. Sadly, for example, one hears of various difficult situations in the Church today rather easily dismissed by invoking God’s mercy.

It is therefore important that we take up a serious consideration of the nature of God’s mercy as He has revealed it to us and as it has been taught in the Magisterium. To assist such reflection, I will concentrate my attention on the teaching in the Sacred Scripture as it has been interpreted by Saint Thomas Aquinas and Pope Saint John Paul II. Then, I will relate that teaching to the natural moral law.

It is my hope that my reflection, offered during the extraordinary year of Divine Mercy will confirm you in your faith and in your service to the Church.

Reflect on the 5 parts here: Catholic Action for Faith and Family Home / Resources / Articles | DEVOTION & PIETY


Cf. Mercy: A Call to Repentance, by Pete Jermann, October 3, 2016 | Crisis Magazine

#AmorisLaetitia Card Burke: “Formal calls for clarification are in process and they simply will demand a response.”

Source: Cardinal Burke insists he is serving Francis, not opposing him, by David Gibson | RNS


Cf. facebook link.


Capture - Card Burke shared link on fb


The Vatican Responds
Salvador Pié-Ninot
Fr. Salvador Pié-Ninot

“Amoris Laetitia” falls into the third category, Father Pie-Ninot said, adding the 1990 instruction’s statement that examples of ordinary magisterium can occur when the pope intervenes “in questions under discussion which involve, in addition to solid principles, certain contingent and conjectural elements.”

The instruction notes that “it often only becomes possible with the passage of time to distinguish between what is necessary and what is contingent,” although, as the Spanish priest said, the instruction insists that even then one must assume that “divine assistance” was given to the pope.

Accepting “Amoris Laetitia” as authoritative church teaching, Father Pie-Ninot said, applies also to the document’s “most significant words” about the possibility of people divorced and remarried without an annulment receiving Communion in limited circumstances. (My emphasis)


Update: VATICAN | NOV. 13, 2016

Cf. “Seeking Clarity.” The Appeal of Four Cardinals To the Pope by Sandro Magister | WWW.CHIESA – One letter. Five questions on the most controversial points of “Amoris Laetitia.” To which Francis has not replied. One more reason, they say, to “inform the people of God about our initiative”


Update: NOV. 14, 2016

Cf. Exclusive Interview: Cardinal Burke Explains Plea to Pope for Clarity, November 14, 2016 | Catholic Action for Faith and Family

Update: NOV. 16, 2016

Pope Francis explains how to put up with annoying people, 2016-11-16 | ROME REPORTS


Cf. Vatican newspaper article: Pope’s apostolic exhortation is magisterial teaching: News Headlines | Catholic Culture, August 24, 2016


Cf. Magistero da accogliere e attuare · Di fronte all’insegnamento dell’esortazione apostolica «Amoris laetitia» · Salvador Pié-Ninot, teologo, 23 agosto 2016 | L’Osservatore Romano


CAI Clarifying Pastoral Questions: Cardinal Burke Provides Answers from Thomas McKenna on Vimeo.


UPDATE: MAR, 25, 2017

Cf. Cardinal Burke Speaks on the “Formal Correction” by Steve Skojec | 1P5


#AmorisLaetitia: Finally the Vatican Enters the Modern World into the Digital Age with a New Genre of Papal Documents

Rome, Friday, April 8, 2016, 11:30 AM

Unveiling and Rollout of a New Genre of Papal Documents

Cut, Copy, and Paste from Church Treasure flavored à la Pope Francis

New genre of papal documents GIF


Further Reading

Pope Francis & The Synod on the Family 2015 STAND CONDEMNED!

Amoris Laetitia and Lets Pretend Published Thursday, April 14, A.D. 2016 | By Donald R. McClarey | The American Catholic

“Amoris Laetitia” Has a Ghostwriter. His Name Is Víctor Manuel Fernández by Sandro Magister

RORATE CÆLI: Family Synods were a hugely expensive Fraud: Essential Passages of Exhortation had already been written 10 years ago

1P5: Amoris Laetitia and John Paul II by Josh Kusch, August 11, 2016

Company Way or Timeless Magisterium? Published Friday, August 26, A.D. 2016 | By Donald R. McClarey | The American Catholic and The Magisterium of the Moment., Thursday, August 25, 2016 | Dyspeptic Mutterings.

Francis’ falsified footnotes: He mangles the Church Fathers, too by Confitebor at 3/03/2017 | RORATE CÆLI


[UPDATE: October 1, 2017]

Is Amoris Laetitia really Thomistic and against “decadent scholasticism”? Let’s hear what the Angelic Doctor says by Luisella Scrosati, La Nuova Bussola Quotidiano, April 11, 2016 | RORATE CÆLI

Joseph Ratzinger: “Criticism of papal pronouncements will be possible and even necessary, to the extent that they lack support in Scripture and the Creed” by Andrew Guernsey | RORATE CÆLI


Burke is one of those critics. One of his main arguments of late is that the papal exhortation is not an expression of the “magisterium,” that is, authoritative church teaching, but that parts of it may be correct but others are not. “A mixture of opinion and doctrine,” as Burke put it in his interview with RNS.

“We can’t understand this document to be magisterium in the way other documents have been because Pope Francis simply has a different approach to the papacy,” the cardinal said. “In his documents he mixes his own thoughts and approaches, which are personal, with questions of doctrine.”

Burke says he knows some disagree with him, but he said that he and “many serious-minded people” in the church hierarchy are calling for Francis to issue a follow-up document.

“I trust that something will have to happen also because some very formal calls for clarification are in process and they simply will demand a response,” Burke said, “not in any kind of hostile or aggressive way, but simply for the sake of souls because people are getting confused.” – Cardinal Burke insists he is serving Francis, not opposing him, by David Gibson | RNS

(My emphasis)